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News

Ex-ByteDance executive claims Chinese Communist Party used data to monitor Hong Kong protests.

Yintao Yu, a former executive at ByteDance, the Chinese company that owns TikTok, has accused some members of the Chinese Communist Party (C.C.P) of using data held by the company to locate and identify Hong Kong protesters. Mr. Yu, who previously worked as the head of engineering for ByteDance in the United States, also alleges […]

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World

LA Times Forced to Cut 74 Jobs Amidst Economic Pressures

The Los Angeles Times will lay off 74 employees due to economic challenges as it transitions from a newspaper to a digital media organization, Executive Editor Kevin Merida announced on Wednesday. The newsroom cuts, which affect editors, producers, and managers, among others, amount to about 13% of staff positions. Merida attributed the cuts to the […]

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World

Trial reveals Deputy Scot Peterson prioritized his own safety over preventing Parkland school shooting

The trial of Scot Peterson, a Florida sheriff’s deputy who failed to take action during the Parkland school shooting in 2018, has begun. Peterson is accused of failing to prevent the deaths of six out of the 17 people who were killed in the shooting. According to prosecutors, Peterson took cover instead of confronting the […]

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Politics

Wesley Bell, Missouri prosecutor, runs for Senate against Republican incumbent Hawley

Wesley Bell, a Black prosecutor from Missouri who became prominent after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, has declared his candidacy for the Republican U.S. Senate seat currently held by Josh Hawley. In his statement, 48-year-old Bell criticized Hawley as being divisive and emphasized his own work in Ferguson, where protests erupted over Brown’s […]

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World

Perceptions of Current Voting Restrictions as an Ongoing Battle for Civil Rights

A group of people who played a significant role in the struggle for voting rights during the era of segregation, violence, and inequality reflect on their struggles. Now, as the US awaits the Supreme Court’s decision on the enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, they recall the tragedies, racism, and oppression they faced. Still, they […]

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World

Luci Johnson’s Emotional Reaction to the Weakening of the Voting Rights Bill After LBJ Signed It

Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon Johnson, recalls in a recent interview from the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas, her experience being at the President’s signing of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1965. Knowing it was going to be an important occasion, she assumed that the ceremony would be held in […]

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World

From Fighting Segregation to Striving for Voting Rights: The Political Evolution of an Activist

In August 1965, Norman Hill was at the AFL-CIO office in Washington, D.C. when he heard the news of the successful passing of the Voting Rights Act in Congress, which led to his moment of joy and remembrance of those who lost their lives struggling for Black voting rights. Now at 90 years old, Hill’s […]

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World

Andrew Young: Martin Luther King’s Right-Hand Man through the turbulent fight for Civil Rights

Upon hearing the news that the Voting Rights Act had been signed into law, Andrew Young wasn’t jubilant, but rather strategic. Young, now 91, was among Martin Luther King Jr.’s closest advisors. However, unlike King and another member of the inner circle, Ralph Abernathy, Young was not present at the signing of the Voting Rights […]

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World

Believer in Integration and Voting Rights Slain during Freedom Summer in Mississippi

Stephen Schwerner, older brother of missing Freedom Summer participant Michael Schwerner, is a veteran American civil rights activist. In 1964, Michael and his colleagues James Chaney and Andrew Goodman disappeared in Mississippi while engaged in a voter registration campaign aimed at increasing Black voter registration during the Civil Rights Movement period. The Schwerner family believed […]

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World

Witnessing the Signing of the 1965 Voting Rights Law Leaves Young Lawyer in Awe

Joel Finkelstein, an attorney in the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, was an accidental witness to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in 1965, one of the landmark events in the civil rights movement. President Lyndon Johnson invited him to witness the signing. He does not know why he was chosen to be present, […]

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